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ENCORE: 5 Articles Helpful to Autism Grandparents

(The following is a previously posted article that may be worth revisiting)


Following are five articles that provide information that can be both instructive and helpful for autism grandparents. Each article has a different theme, and each is on a different website. I’ve included an excerpt from each article.


 



Being a Grandparent to a Child with Autism

– Marcus Center for Autism


Here’s an excerpt:

“While a parent takes your grandchild with autism to a therapy appointment or attends a school meeting, you may want to offer to stay with any siblings. You can provide sibling support by helping with homework, attending recitals, or going to school programs and after school activities with your typical grandchildren to give them special recognition and time when mom or dad aren’t available.”

Read the full article here.


 

30 Things Parents of Children on the Autism Spectrum Want You to Know

- Grandparent Autism Network (an organization that serves Orange County, California)


Here’s an excerpt:

Please let my child play with your child. There is no need to tag us in every Facebook article about autism. We can’t just “get a babysitter.” I’m not an autism expert.

Read the full article here.


 


10 Ways to Make a Difference for Your Autistic Grandchild”

- Autism Awareness Centre, Inc.


Here’s an excerpt:

Gift certificates for movies, dinner, spa, and fitness clubs are a way to “force” a parent to take time for him or her self.

Read the full article here.


 


Grandparents Have Feelings Too!

- Center for Autism Research


Here’s an excerpt:

Grandparents my struggle to understand information presented to them about their precious grandchildren. Many times grandparents, in an effort to be positive and lighten the mood, or wish this all away, will make remarks such as: “She doesn’t look autistic,” or “I don’t know what you are talking about – she is just like you were when you were her age.” Remarks of this nature can be very painful to the adult children raising their recently diagnosed child. It makes the parents feel isolated and alone in their journey, without the support of their parents.

Read the full article here.


 


5 Ways to Connect With an Autistic Child When You’re Apart”

- Every Star Is Different


Here’s an excerpt:

At first Sunshine really struggled with phone conversations with us. She’s never liked talking on the phone and hadn’t had much practice before residential. Thankfully I came up with a schedule of sorts for our conversations a couple weeks ago. Understanding the sequence of the conversation, when they begin and when they end is incredibly helpful for autistic kiddos. Turn taking is also a great way to help with difficulties with communication. 1. We say our nightly hellos. Usually Sunshine has something she wants to tell me right away. 2. I ask Sunshine three questions. 3. Sunshine asks me three questions. 4. We blow loud kisses over the phone and say “I love you.” 5. My husband then reads Sunshine a scripture story and bedtime story over the phone.


Read the full article here.


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